Stress and wellbeing in Australia 2014

For the fourth consecutive year, the APS will conduct its annual 'Stress and wellbeing survey', measuring levels of stress, distress and wellbeing across the adult community. In 2014, there will be a special focus on looking at lifestyle factors that affect wellbeing.

Findings from previous years have confirmed that many people struggle to maintain a healthy lifestyle, which is concerning given rising rates of chronic health problems and obesity experienced by Australians. The survey will identify the health and lifestyle issues of Australians, what activities and strategies they are using to become healthier, and any barriers they perceive to achieving their lifestyle goals.

The results of the 2014 survey will be release during National Psychology Week (9-15 November).

Below is a summary of the key finding of last year's survey:

Stress and wellbeing in Australia survey 2013: Key findings

  • In 2013, Australians reported significantly lower levels of wellbeing and significantly higher levels of stress and distress than in 2012 and 2011.
  • Almost three-quarters of Australians (73%) reported that stress was having at least some impact with almost one in five (17%) reporting that stress was having a strong to very strong impact on their physical health.
  • In 2013, significantly more Australians (65% 2013 vs. 60% 2012) reported that current stress was affecting their mental health, with one in five people reporting it had a strong to very strong impact on their mental health.
  • One in four (24%) Australians reported mental health issues as a source of stress.
  • Significantly more Australians reported visiting social networking sites, eating or sleeping more to manage stress than in previous years.
  • Finances, family and health issues continued to rank as the top causes of stress for Australians.
  • Working Australians reported significantly lower overall workplace wellbeing in 2013 compared with findings in previous years.
  • Working Australians reported significantly lower levels of job satisfaction and significantly lower levels of interest in their jobs than in the previous two years.
  • Generally, working women were significantly more likely than working men to report that they felt valued and supported to do their job.
  • Women were significantly more likely than men to report being involved in their job.

 

Previous surveys

Understanding and managing stress

Download the stress tip sheet PDF

 Download the 'understanding and managing stress' brochure

 

Stress tips infographic

Stress tips infographic

Download our tips on how to manage everyday stress


How Australians manage stress (taken from NPW 2013 survey)

how Australians manage stress

Download the infographic

 

Tips on how to manage everyday stress

Tips for managing everyday stress

 

Medicare rebates

Medicare rebates are available for psychological treatment by registered psychologists. Learn more (pdf)