The APS offers a range of awards and prizes each year to honour outstanding achievements in psychology.

President’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in Australia

Alfred Allan
Alfred Allan

The Award recognises distinguished contributions to Australian psychology by psychologists at later career stage.

 

Alfred Allan

Professor Alfred Allan's research has focussed on the interaction between psychology, law and ethics at various levels. A particular aim of his research has been to generate data about victims and perpetrators of violence, including sexual violence, which psychologists could use during forensic assessments. A feature of Alfred's research is examining areas where existing psychological data are scarce and where research is very difficult to do, for example his investigation of instruments used to assess the risk of violent offending by Australian men, and research on secondary victims. Related work focuses on forgiving, reconciliation and apology in general, but with a specific emphasis on the role of these constructs in law (e.g., in civil law and equal opportunity proceedings) and ethics, specifically in the so-called open disclosure process. His broader research in ethics is ongoing and has led to the publication of two monographs and an edited book. Alfred has wide experience teaching students in various disciplines and has received a number of teaching awards. Alfred has been very active in the continuing professional development of psychologists in Western Australia and he continues to do this in South Africa as well, returning there every second year to present workshops across the country. For the past 20 years Alfred has been engaging with policy makers, professionals working for government departments and non-governmental agencies, and members of professional bodies to inform them of psychological knowledge that is relevant to their professional activities. He has served as consultant on various State government committees, such as the Dangerous Sexual Offender Act Committee. He also provides services to non-governmental organisations such as the Incest Survivors Association, often on a pro bono basis. He was the founding Chair of the WA section of the APS College of Forensic Psychologists and is the past Chair of the national executive of the College. He has also served the APS as a member of various committees and as the Chair of the Ethics Committee for four years. His most significant contribution to the APS, and psychology in general, has been his work as chair of the group that reviewed the 1997 APS Code of Ethics and published the 2007 Code. The group succeeded to produce a code of international standard that builds on the cumulative wisdom of their predecessors since 1949, and has now been adopted as the code of ethics for the psychology profession in Australia by the Psychology Board of Australia (PBA). Alfred now chairs the Professional Conduct Committee of the PBA.

Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award

Barbara Gillam
Barbara Gillam

The Award recognises distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to psychology by psychologists at mid- or later career stage.

 

Barbara Gillam

Professor Barbara Gillam graduated from Sydney University with First Class Honours in psychology during the now legendary days of O'Neil's leadership. She did her PhD at ANU with Gavin Seagrim on stereoscopic vision, a field which she approached innovatively as perceptual rather than ‘sensory'. Barbara explored both theoretically and experimentally many hitherto neglected or unknown properties of this remarkable ability, most of which are now universally acknowledged as critical. Her approach can also be characterised as ecological. She briefly taught at the University of Reading in the UK before following her husband to New York where she was a Research Associate at Columbia University. Barbara moved on to an Associate Professorship then Professorship at SUNY College of Optometry, teaching vision science with a particular focus on binocular vision. She returned to Australia in 1986 to become Head of Psychology at UNSW where she was made a Scientia Professor in 2005. Barbara has been active on ARC panels and APS committees and helped set up the Psychology Foundation of Australia to actively promote psychology as a science within the discipline and profession. She is a Fellow of the APS, the Association for Psychological Science (USA) and the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia. Her theoretical and empirical interests have included space perception generally, geometric illusions, approaches to traditional Gestalt issues (including over many years visual grouping, figure-ground, illusory contours and perceptual completion) and most recently the representation of object occlusion in paintings, including those of the early renaissance and aboriginal art.

Distinguished Contribution to Psychology Education Award

Stephen Provost
Stephen Provost

The Award recognises outstanding contribution to the education of psychologists in Australia over an extended period.

 

Stephen Provost

Dr Stephen Provost's involvement in the scholarship of teaching and learning began with enrolment in the new Graduate Certificate in Higher Education at UNSW, following the worst lecture ever experienced by first-year psychology students at Macquarie University! Studying for this degree convinced him that psychology had a great deal to offer, which encouraged further involvement through grants from the Committee for Australian University Teaching with a number of colleagues while at the University of Newcastle. In 2004 Steve was given an opportunity to become involved in the Australian Universities' Teaching Committee Disciplinary Project with a team of colleagues led by Professor Ottmar Lipp. Since then he has seen the creation of an Australian Psychology Educator's Network, and has been part of the team (led by Associate Professor Jacquelyn Cranney) involved in the establishment of the Teaching, Learning and Psychology Interest Group of the APS. Steve's interests in teaching and learning have largely focussed on the appropriate use of information technology in higher education, including the integration of commercial and home-built simulation software into laboratories and other parts of teaching programs. However working at Southern Cross University has also fostered a strong commitment to enhancing the educational experience of students in rural and regional Australia and more effectively broadening the reach of psychology. Most recently he has been considering how to more fully exploit the nexus between psychological knowledge and teaching outcomes, particularly with respect to the acquisition of writing skills, and this will be the subject of a UniTas teaching grant collaboration with Associate Professor Frances Martin
during 2011.

Early Career Research Award

Sue Cotton
Sue Cotton

The Award recognises excellence in scientific achievement in psychology among psychologists at early career stage.

 

Sue Cotton

Associate Professor Sue Cotton was awarded her PhD in clinical neuropsychology in 2006 from La Trobe University for her thesis focusing on measurement issues in the assessment of developmental dyslexia. Her work in the fields of developmental disability and psychiatry has been facilitated by a strong background in clinical research methodology and biostatistics, having been awarded a MAppSc (statistics) in 2002. Sue has worked at the University of Melbourne Centre for Youth Mental Health since 2002. In 2009, she was awarded the Ronald Phillip Griffith Fellowship by the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Science at the University of Melbourne. Her research is focused on understanding predictors of good outcome from first episode psychosis (FEP). She is also focusing on newer longitudinal statistical models (e.g., latent growth modelling) that will assist with understanding changes in symptoms, functioning and quality of life associated with FEP. In addition, Sue is involved with a number of treatment trials (including psychotherapy and/or drug trials) which have the potential to have an impact on quality of care for patients with mental illness. She has over 75 publications and has attracted over $1 million in grant funding. She has recently been promoted to Principal Research Fellow.

Damien Riggs
Damien Riggs

Damien Riggs

Dr Damien Riggs completed his PhD at the University of Adelaide in 2006 and was an ARC postdoctoral fellow there until 2009, conducting research on the experiences and motivations of Australian foster carers. He is now a lecturer in social work at Flinders University, where he teaches on child protection, gender and sexuality, practice approaches to working with families and children, and research methods. Damien is the author of over 100 publications in the areas of gender and sexuality, family and parenting studies, and critical race and whiteness studies, including three sole authored books and a recently co-authored textbook, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer Psychology. The empirical research informing these publications has been supported by grants to the value of $600,000, including three ARC grants and numerous small institutional grants. Research topics include the developmental trajectories of Australian foster families, the experiences of refugee and migrant students in South Australian schools, the experiences of Australian sperm donors, the educational experiences of lesbian mother families, and the support needs of lesbian and gay foster carers. Damien is currently serving his third term as the national convenor of the APS Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology Interest Group and is the founding editor of the Interest Group's journal.

Early Career Teaching Award

Judith Gullifer
Judith Gullifer

The Award recognises teachers of psychology in early career stage in Australian universities who show potential for excellence.

 

Judith Gullifer

Judith Gullifer is completing her PhD at Charles Sturt University where she is also a lecturer. Her research focus is to try to understand how humans perceive a range of differing experiences primarily from a qualitative epistemology. Her research brings together scholarship in psychology and teaching, examining students' perceptions of plagiarism within a regional university setting. Theory and research in psychology show that a thorough understanding of an individual's view of an issue or problem is an essential requirement for successful change of that person's attitudes and behaviour. The aim of this research program is to systematically examine students' understanding of, and attitude toward, plagiarism using broad theoretical frameworks from psychology and criminology in order to develop strategies that enhance academic integrity. Prior to commencing at Charles Sturt University, Judith was a clinical counsellor working for NSW Health. This role also involved delivering adult education, primarily workplace training and development for medical and allied health professionals. As a registered psychologist, Judith is committed to the discipline's scientist practitioner model of working from evidence (peer reviewed research) to inform professional practice and work as an academic. Accordingly, her teaching is informed by, and reflects, ‘best practice' in teaching and adult learning.

Gery Karantzas
Gery Karantzas

Gery Karantzas

Dr Gery Karantzas is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology at Deakin University. He has published numerous studies in the area of close personal relationships with a specific interest in investigating couple and family relationships during transitions and in adult attachment. His research activities have been funded by grants from the Australian Research Council, the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and beyondblue. His research and teaching in the area of relationships has received numerous institutional and national honours, including awards from La Trobe University, Deakin University and the APS. Gery has developed a strong interest in teaching pedagogies that foster enhanced learning outcomes and the workplace preparedness of undergraduate students. He recently led a teaching and learning grant to develop and evaluate the effectiveness and impact of an interactive tutorial program aimed at improving students' engagement and learning, and development of psychology graduate attributes. The evaluation of this program revealed that the tutorial program significantly enhanced student engagement, intrinsic motivation, deep learning and various graduate attributes. Gery's work around this project has become widely recognised at Deakin University through the receipt of a Teaching Innovation award by the Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing, and Behavioural Sciences as well as a Deakin University Award for Teaching Excellence.

Award for Excellent PhD Thesis in Psychology

Phoebe Bailey
Phoebe Bailey

The Award recognises outstanding research in psychology by students who have recently completed a PhD at an Australian university.

Phoebe Bailey

 

University of New South Wales

Thesis title - The social cognitive neuroscience of empathy in older adulthood

Elizabeth Newnham
Elizabeth Newnham

Elizabeth Newnham

 

University of Western Australia

Thesis title - Informing best practice in mental health: Using feedback to improve clinical outcomes

Kiley Seymour
Kiley Seymour

Kiley Seymour

 

University of Sydney

Thesis title - The neural basis of visual feature binding

Emma Thomas

Emma Thomas

 

Australian National University

Thesis title - Aligning identity, emotion and beliefs to boost commitment to international development and cooperation

APS Prize

The Prize is awarded to each student who gains first place at the end of an accredited fourth year program in psychology in universities offering a program.

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InPsych February 2011